xanthohumol hops beer diabetes obesity hypertension cancer

Attention Beer Drinkers: Compound found in Hops lowers cholesterol, blood sugar and weight gain

If you’re a health & fitness nerd like myself, you already know that metabolic syndrome (abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated blood sugar, high serum triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol) is fast becoming the #1 health concern around the globe.

img_img_9781587798054_metabolic_syndrome_chartIf you’re a beer lover, you already know that one of the main ingredients in beer is hops.

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What you may not know is that, a recent study at Oregon State University has identified specific intake levels of xanthohumol, a natural flavonoid found in hops, significantly improved some of the underlying markers of metabolic syndrome in laboratory animals and also reduced weight gain.

Unfortunately for the beer drinkers out there, while xanthohumol is found in beer, it would take 3,500 pints per day for a 70 kg /  human to get enough xanthohumol as was used in the study.

And I’m pretty sure that the calories found in 3,500 pints of beer would counteract all of the health benefits of the xanthohumol.

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What is Xanthohumol and how does it work?

  • Xanthohumol is a natural flavonoid found in hops and beer.
  • As it pertains to metabolic syndrome, xanthohumol has been shown to decrease levels of LDL (the “bad” cholesterol), lower insulin levels and reduce levels of IL-6, a biomarker of systemic inflammation.
  • And if that wasn’t enough, there is research hinting that xanthohumol may be a potent anti-cancer agent.

How cool is that…a substance, found naturally in beer, may turn out to be a potent (and inexpensive) way to prevent obesity, prevent type 2 diabetes, prevent hypertension, prevent cholesterol jammed arteries…and prevent obesity.

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What does this research mean to me…right NOW????

Not a whole heck of a lot.

  • On one hand, you can go online and buy xanthohumol supplements.
  • On the other hand, all of the research conducted on xanthohumol has been done on animals – no human studies. As a result, we have no idea of effective dosage and SAFETY.

My advice?  Stay tuned for more research.

Reference

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Beer vs Gatorade

In 1965, researchers at the University of Florida (Go Gators) developed the first sports drink designed to replenish the fluid, carbohydrates and electrolytes that are dilost from the body during physical exertion.

And for 46 years, their creation – Gatorade – has reigned supreme as the #1 flavored sports drink.

Athletes (and non-athletes) around world chug down millions of bottles of neon colored Gatorade each year in an attempt to “recover” from their “intense” workouts.

Its combination of water, sugar, sodium and potassium has been designed to have a similar osmolarity as human blood…which is important because transferring fluids and nutrients to the blood is easiest when the composition of both is similar.

As a result of this freaky blood-like osmolarity, athletes absorb all that Gatorade goodness as quickly and efficiently as possible allowing them to train harder in their quest to “Be Like Mike”..or Lebron or Blake Griffin or…

But maybe not for much longer.

Erdinger, a Bavarian brewmeister, is touting its no-alcohol beer as the latest sport drink for athletes, handing it out at the finish line of sporting events and touting its regenerative benefits.

Unlike Gatorade, Erdinger Alkoholfrei is served up with a frothy head. And it comes in one color – a golden hue – unlike conventional sport drinks.

Several top athletes from Europe quaffed the beverage from giant mugs on the podium of the World Cup biathlons held this month in northern Maine.

The company touts the beverage as an isotonic (like Gatorade), vitamin-rich, no-additive beverage with natural regenerative powers that help athletes recover from a workout.

In other words, it’s carbohydrate-loaded refreshment without the alcoholic buzz of beer or the jitters caused by some energy drinks.

But…it’s still beer.

And I just can’t picture the average Gatorade customer cracking open a cold Erdinger in the middle of his/her health club after a grueling spinning and/or hot yoga session.

But then again, these maniacs seem to have no problem chugging down the brewskis after completing their Warrior Dash.

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Reference

  • Associated Press

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